Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 26, 2019 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

1:30 pm
under intense scrutiny. i think, you know, we have to all continue to support the development of women as referees. i think it's a very important part of the game and at this level half of the development of people is giving them the experience, so, you know, it isn't perfection. but, you know, we are very supportive of the women trying to do theirjobs in this tournament. now the focus turns to norway. a team which england have history with. four years ago, lucy bronze sent norway home and fired the lionesses to their first—ever win in a world cup knockout match. this year the scandinavians are on a high after beating australia on penalties to reach the quarterfinals. england may be favourites, but breaking down this team will be their toughest test yet. time for a look at the weather. here's tomasz schafernaker.
1:31 pm
no threat of extremely high temperatures here but it is going to get hotter in the next few days. here are some major centres in europe. paris getting up into the mid or high 30s, madrid almost a0 degrees. these are the top temperatures that we could expect in the next couple of days or so so possibly up to a5 degrees in parts of france for the pier in the uk i would not be surprised if it gets into the low 30s, something that we do get most years but certainly not those super high temperatures heading our way. at the moment it is relatively cool and temperatures in the north—east of england quite cool and on the seafront itself may be only around 15 degrees for that for most of us in the high teens are low 20s for that back in february we had a temperature of 22 degrees sell similar values to what we had all
1:32 pm
those months ago and it shows you how different the weather is across the uk compared to the near continent. quite chilly in the north east, very clear night so tomorrow a case of pretty much wall—to—wall sunshine right from the word go, it is going to be a beautiful day and temperatures could creep up to 25, 26 degrees in the lowlands of scotland. into the mid 20s further south. high pressure then slap bang gci’oss south. high pressure then slap bang across north—western parts of europe, pretty much dominating a huge chunk of the continent. we have those sunny skies and the heat and looking at france and spain, similar to the saharan desert there so really it is dangerous heat. friday we start to pick up more of a southerly wind and the thinking is the highest temperatures will be gci’oss the highest temperatures will be across more western parts of the uk so across more western parts of the uk so the high 20s possible from the west cou ntry so the high 20s possible from the west country may be into parts of
1:33 pm
scotla nd west country may be into parts of scotland as well. still cool on the east coast and then on saturday the heat, the heatwave shifts a little further towards the east so temperatures will rise in the south—east and into east anglia. in lincolnshire for example, 32 degrees in london. and you can see there high values extending into parts of yorkshire as well. so no prospect of a0 degrees here in the uk but i think we can all degree but 32 degrees is hot enough for us. — will agree. and that is all from the bbc news at 0ne news team. goodbye. good afternoon, it's 1.30pm and here's your latest sports news. england may be without captain steph houghton and her central defensive partner
1:34 pm
millie bright for tomorrow's women's world cup quarter final with norway. they‘ re both major doubts, horton has an injury, bright is carrying a bug ahead of the match in le havre, where temperatures could reach the mid thirties. you plan for these moments. i said six months ago we do not want to get your quarterfinal and throw a young kid in or someone we have not tested. who does not know our system. there has been a plan behind it. it is for moments like this. where i am totally relaxed. when i got into management i said from day one, woi’i’y got into management i said from day one, worry about those who can get one, worry about those who can get on the bus and those who can get on the bus are the fit once. u nfortu nately, the bus are the fit once. unfortunately, in situations you are going to have injuries. it is opportunities for others. and i put my life on the replaces replacements to be the best on the pitch. i like its been hot so to my players. we
1:35 pm
feel good in the heat. it will be a factor, but we have planned for it. we had to eat at st george's park where they virtually lived in a sauna. there was no state that make air—conditioning. we have planned for it. they were thermals. there are no surprises. for it. they were thermals. there are no surprises. we have planned and prepared every eventuality. kick off at hpm. hpm. manchester united have reached an agreement to sign england under—21full—back aaron wan—bissaka from crystal palace in a deal believed to be worth around £50 million. he'll be offered a long—term contract that would lift his salary from £10,000 per week, he is the lowest—paid player in palace's first—team squad, to around £80,000 a week. and tottenham look set to sign a player for the first time in three transfer windows with 18 year—old leeds united winger jack clarke set to have a medical ahead of a move in the region of £10 million. clarke will be the first player in at the club since lucas moura
1:36 pm
from paris saint—germain in january 2018. british number onejohanna konta is out of the eastbourne international after a disappointing straight sets defeat by world number 62 0ns jabeur of tunisia. konta lost 6—3, 6—2 in a below—par performance with the start of wimbledon just five days away. she lost in the second round of the birmingham classic last week. konta is seeded 19th for the women's singles, it was announced this morning. ash barty, is new women's world number one is seeded first. naomi 0saka is second and reigning champions angelique kerber is fifth. the women's seedings follow the wta rankings. not so in the men's where world number two rafa nadal is seeded third, with wimbledon taking into account a players grass court record. nadal said it doesn't seem right, he's likely to be in the same half of the draw as top seed
1:37 pm
novak djocovic and in line to meet the top seed in the semi finals. finally, play has just got underway in birmingham in today's cricket world cup match between new zealand and pakistan, a game that england will be watching closely as it could have a bearing on their chances of reaching the semi—finals. play was delayed for an hour because of wet weather. new zealand won the toss and will bat first. and we've had an early wicket with martin guptill bowled lots of england fans keeping a night on this one. you can see more on the website to keep up with us. that's all the sport for now. twenty candidates vying
1:38 pm
for the democratic party presidential nomination in the united states will hold their first head—to—head television debates over the next two evenings. former vice presidentjoe biden is leading the pack in the early polls, but he's facing stiff challenges from more left of centre candidates such as bernie sanders. gary o'donoghue reports. after months and months of warm up, this is where it all gets serious. in the miami heat, 20 leading candidates on stage before a nationwide audience. the sheer size of the democratic field means it will be hard for anyone of them to make a real splash but, put a foot wrong, and your candidacy could sink without trace, more than 200 days before a single party vote is cast. constant eating is central to getting the democratic party nomination. events like this south carolina fish—fry at the weekend allowed the candidates to rub shoulders with the party power brokers
1:39 pm
and to endear themselves to one of the states that bodes early in the primary season. whoever the democratic nominee is... despite some recent missteps and policy confusion, the former vice presidentjoe biden is significantly out in front, touting his experience and appeal to white working—class voters. if the former vp is running as a centrist, his two closest opponents currently are fighting for the progressive heart of a party that has moved left in recent times. and we are going to bring our people together, around an agenda that works for all of us, not just the 1%. i'm in this fight because i believe that the time for small ideas is over. we need big, structural change. in tonight's first debate, elizabeth warren will be up against two other senators, four current or former members of the house of representatives,
1:40 pm
a governor, and the mayor of new york. tomorrow night, bernie sanders will notjust be up againstjoe biden, but also three other senators, and pete buttigieg, the gay mayor from indiana, who has been the standout unknown candidate so far. in typical style, the president has already laid into the field. well you've got some beauties there. 350 million people and that's the best we can do. i don't think so. even as democrats i could pick better than that. these two debates will be followed by many more but some key battle lines will be drawn over the next a8 hours. gary o'donoghue, bbc news, miami. theresa may has been been challenged over the uk's relationship with saudi arabia during prime minister's questions before mrs may heads off for herfinal g20 summit injapan, which starts on friday.
1:41 pm
ian blackford called on theresa may to admit that neither candidates should be elected prime minister. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith is inside the house of parliament. hygiene. four to go. hygiene. fourto go. fourwhat? prime minister's questions for theresa may. i suspect she has got on the hop today afterjeremy corbyn devoted all six questions to arms sales to saudi arabia and yemen. let's speak to drew hendry, from the
1:42 pm
snp,. what was ian up to today? let's speak to drew hendry, from the snp,. what was ian up to today7|j snp,. what was ian up to today?|j think snp,. what was ian up to today?” think ian was pointing out what people need to hear. if you cannot speak the truth about boris johnson here in parliament, where can you speak the truth? the fact is that he has told lies and made racist comments and he deserves to be called out for that behaviour. he is somebody who is almost in procession to becoming the next minister oh the paradox is you should be cheering on borisjohnson because as paradox is you should be cheering on boris johnson because as you paradox is you should be cheering on borisjohnson because as you claim he is rocket fuel to independence? there is no good tory prime minister for scotland. scotland has been ignored which has been brought sharply into focus by the brexit process. the people of scotland voted six to 2% to remain ignored all the way through to make any
1:43 pm
inroads with the eu —— uk government. what we see is people ignoring what is going on scotland and not taking scotland's interests into account. you are northern ireland secretary. you are involved inissues ireland secretary. you are involved in issues around the union. we have her concerns about the risk that this contest might impose on keeping the union together? serious concerns with well, if boris becomes our next minister, he is absolutely determined to become prime minister for the whole of the united kingdom. we are a party who believes fundamentally in the huge benefits that all four nations of the united kingdom derive from being together. that will be an important part of his premiership and i think that the abrasive and negative tone by the snp does not help in anyway. that is not the kind of we want. nicola
1:44 pm
sturgeon does not want to engage in this kind of negative personal attacks but we get it in the house of commons from her mps. jeremy corbyn did not go with matters brexit but rather saudi arabia and the arms sales to the yemen. curious ina way? the arms sales to the yemen. curious in a way? an important issue but was it the issue to raise at prime minister's questions? absolutely. a vital issue to be raised certainly with the court case and judgment that has just inherited. we must remember thatjeremy hunt's liam fox and boris johnson remember thatjeremy hunt's liam fox and borisjohnson whether ministers who signed off sale to arabia without considering the deaths of civilians. we have seen hundreds of thousands of children die, starvation, we have to do something. the fact the government are going to appeal thisjust the fact the government are going to appeal this just sounds so much. can i pick appeal this just sounds so much. can ipick up appeal this just sounds so much. can i pick up what was just set about what is's the fact that his language is so sloppy, and certainly i have
1:45 pm
had lots of colleagues visit richard radcliffe outside the iranian embassy will stop who is asking for help when it comes to the extension of his wives incarceration. that is because of the sloppy language that we have seen. but how do you deal with the borisjohnson premiership? clearly he will be a very different prime minister in terms of his campaigning style, the way he relates to the public. so how does jeremy corbyn front up to a boris johnson prime minister? we get him out and we have a general election and we have a labour government. certainly, this language, the sloppy languagejust to certainly, this language, the sloppy language just to talk very swiftly about a local issue, we have had a number of arrests for historic child six exportation. i was able to get 1.2 million for these investigations and boris johnson says 1.2 million for these investigations and borisjohnson says it is wasting money. these are survivors of historic child sexual exportation. we need to show him who he is. to
1:46 pm
reason we need to show him who he is. to reason do you have any reservations? as foreign secretary, there are claims he was not on top of his brief. do you have any concerns as we go into brexit that we need inattention to detail which boris johnson lacks? i have no doubts on that. i believe that boris is the candidate in this election to beat jeremy corbyn and also to deliver on brexit. i know that of course the country is divided on brexit matters but i think what unites many of us as we feel we cannot go on as we are. we have to get on with us. we have to actually implement how the electorate voted. that is why think boris is the best. he may well deliver what 52% want, but we have not heard him talk much about the a8%. not heard him talk much about the 4896. i regularly hear from people on both sides of this debate. there are many whichever way they voted in the referendum, we do recognise that we
1:47 pm
have to get on with it. after all, if we decide as a parliament not to employ meant the results, that could result in a real dent in confidence in democracy. both main parties will end up being punished at the ballot boxes as we were at the european elections. drew hendry, we are getting ahead of ourselves talk about boris johnson, but that seems likely. what is the next step for nicola sturgeon and the snp if you have a borisjohnson premiership? borisjohnson would be a disastrous prime minster but it —— we have seen generally can't does not care either. jeremy hunt. what i'm asking is what do you do in pursuit of independence with we are trying to do what we want to do. we have had that mandate reinforced in the elections which is to stop brexit.
1:48 pm
people are more alive to the opportunity of independence. we have seen opportunity of independence. we have seena opportunity of independence. we have seen a way opportunity of independence. we have seen a way that scotland has been ignored over the particularly sharp focus over the brexiteers and they have seen the fact that what we would be better doing is taking our place as an independent european nation. as an equal partner around the table. so that is coming soon. i think it is inevitable that there will be a referendum in the process is going through the scottish parliament to enable that situation at the moment. i am to ask each of you the borisjohnson red bus question. brace yourselves. what do you do to relax? i like to spend time with my family and walk my dog. i watch tv. any particular programmes? many that i like. mainly on the bbc. i would recommend handmade sale. i go running with my dog. there are some leisure time
1:49 pm
activities which don't involve trying to cobble together a bit of cardboard into the shape of a red bus. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. a multi billion dollar aid package for migrant families detained after entering the us is partially approved, as images of a father and daughter, drowned in the rio grande, emerges. the two rivals for the conservative leadership continue to clash over whether the uk should commit to leaving the eu on october the 31st. the bbc discovers that moors murderer ian brady was allowed to mix with vulnerable young prisoners for more than five years, even after one claimed that brady had had sex with him.
quote
1:50 pm
i'm ben bland. in the business news. troubled fashion chain bonmarche has warned that trading in the first quarter has been ‘poor‘. it has said it's now considering a £57 million takeover offerfrom uk billionaire philip day, an offer it had rejected. its shares fell 26% as it blamed bad weather for its performance. san francisco has become the first city in the usa to ban the sale of e—cigarettes. it's because of concerns about a "dramatic surge" in young people using them. stores are now banned from selling the vaporisers. it's also illegal for online retailers to deliver to addresses in the city. e—cigarette producers say the move will "create a thriving black market". robots are coming. up to 20 million manufacturing jobs around the world could be replaced by robots by 2030. that's the prediction from oxford economics, an analysis firm. it's calling for action to prevent a damaging increase in income inequality.
1:51 pm
breaking news. bath store has gone into administration. putting many jobs and stores at risk. it will continue to trade well buyer is sought. it has faced several months of trading difficulties. we will bring you more on that as we get it. now it may be 170 years old, but looks still matter. boots, has opened a new look store in covent garden, the openings created 130 newjobs, includes wellness and beauty halls. and it's been decided that no single use plastic bags will be used in the new store. earlier, our correspondent emma simpson, spoke to sebastianjames, the uk vice president and managing director of boots.
1:52 pm
it is quite a bit different. we are really excited about it. i think what it does is recognise a fundamental truth about what boots is. we are not one business but three. we have a beauty business, we wa nt three. we have a beauty business, we want people to look as great as they can. we have a wellness business which encourages people to make really good choices about how they wa nt to really good choices about how they want to live their lives. and we have a health business where we give advice and help people to get better if they have something they want to fix. so those three things are com pletely fix. so those three things are completely different. what we have tried to excess in the shop is how different they can be. it is a really successful business. it is one which has a real special place in the hearts of the nations i think. ifeel very in the hearts of the nations i think. i feel very privileged to be pa rt think. i feel very privileged to be part of it. and for this brief moment, the steward of this incredible brand. and i think all of us are absolutely determined to make it the best bits it can be. that is a plan. what was the last book you bought? i mean an actual, printed book.
1:53 pm
the publishing industry made £6 billion last year. but the reason i ask is because we are buying fewer physical books and more e—books. figures from the publishers association show a 3% increase in digital sales, bringing revenue from e—books and other digital formats to £2.6 billion. but sales of printed books fell by 5% to £3.5 billion as we increasingly move to e—readers or other forms of entertainment. joining us now is stephen lotinga, chief executive of the publishers association. as the industry adapting fast enough to the changing demands from readers and this appetite, growth in demand for digital books? absolutely. in the uk we still bought 380 million physical books. they still make up
1:54 pm
80% of our revenue. it is an incredible popular pastime. but we are making huge investments into digital and that is starting to pay off. we are seeing big growth areas such as audiobooks.” off. we are seeing big growth areas such as audiobooks. i notice school textbooks have taken a hit. how much warriors that? i think that is a real hit. the government says they are fundamental to teaching our children but it appears schools are not able to buy the books that government ministers want them to.” also notice that global exports are quite a crucial source of income. for the publishing and book industry. anyone who watches the business segments will often see as touching on global trade tensions. given exports are so important, how much is a concern of what is going on in the wild wider world? 5996 of our revenue comes from overseas. in
1:55 pm
particular from our revenue comes from overseas. in particularfrom europe. about a third of those come from europe. so we are very concerned about any unsettling imbalances in relationships without european markets. in terms of america and china, the key lesson is in the past, books have been seen as an area which would not have had ta riffs area which would not have had tariffs placed on them, we are seeing tariffs or the threats of ta riffs seeing tariffs or the threats of tariffs being placed from china and america. why is there a discrepancy in the way that e—books are taxed compared to physical books with purely historical reasons. when we set our vat laws, e—books are not exist. the digital book did not exist. the digital book did not exist. since then we have been in europe and up until last year, european law did not allow a reduction in vat on digital books but now they have changed the law. so whether we are in the eu or outside of it. the government has the power to reduce that and we think they should. especially when you consider the kin of groups who are reliant on audio and e—books, particularly those who have visual
1:56 pm
impairments but also the elderly. it feels unfair they should pay 20% more. briefly, the last wiki but stephen has not a book by sally rooney. she has brought out one recently, i think she's a great writer. thanks for the recommendation. i will add writer. thanks for the recommendation. iwill add it writer. thanks for the recommendation. i will add it to list. that's all the business news. you can't beat a real book. thank you very much ben. now it's time for a look at the weather. is that extreme heatwave bells across europe the fact that we are an island is a blessing. you can see sunny skies here, across the continent. a few wisps across parts
1:57 pm
of the uk. for some of us, quite a cloudy day today. particularly around the north—east. yorkshire, the north—east, the midlands. best of the sunshine today around scotla nd of the sunshine today around scotland and northern ireland. then later in the day, across the southern counties. very modest temperatures today. around 15 on the north sea coast. i teamed for many of us. maybe scraping 22 or 23 in one or two spots. very little change for tonight. in fact, one or two spots. very little change fortonight. infact, it one or two spots. very little change for tonight. in fact, it will turn quite nippy believe it or not. in the north—east of england, temperatures could get to around 5 degrees. notjust temperatures could get to around 5 degrees. not just the temperatures could get to around 5 degrees. notjust the north—east but parts of yorkshire as well. tomorrow, we lose some of that cloud and it is going to be a spectacularly sunny day. remember a very powerful sunshine this time of the year. temperatures will be higher as well. we could hit the mid—20s in one or two spots, for example the lowlands of scotland.
1:58 pm
could be the mid—20s in the south too. high pressure close to the uk means very settled sunny conditions. that height is also going to draw the heat from the south, you can see how red hot france and italy is. the heat will push into parts of germany and poland. iwon't heat will push into parts of germany and poland. i won't say it will be excruciatingly hot but those temperatures will be rising by the time we get to saturday. friday is still a relatively cool day. temperatures of around 26 or 27 degrees. 18 on the north sea coast. and then, we see a dramatic rise in the temperatures across some central and eastern parts of the uk. the winds are blowing straight out of france where we have that inferno across the channel. temperatures possibly up to a0 degrees in france. top temperatures here probably hit 32 degrees over the weekend. but
1:59 pm
ta ke 32 degrees over the weekend. but take a look at these excruciatingly hot values further south.
2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 2: outcry in america. the distressing images of children in detention centres as the border crisis deepens. political parties there blame each other. right now, little children are enduring trauma and terror. many are living in squalor at border patrol stations. some are sleeping on the cold ground without warm blankets or hot meals. the bbc discovers that moors murderer ian brady was allowed to mix with vulnerable young prisoners for more than five years. a diary clash. the two rivals for the conservative leadership continue to argue over whether the uk should commit to leaving the eu on 31st october. an old baileyjury is shown cctv images moments before lee pomeroy was stabbed 18 times on a train in front of his 1a—year—old son.

95 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on